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Collective Bargaining Highlights – Summary – May 2017

  • Issued: October 2017
  • Content last reviewed: October 2017

Bargaining Overview

In May, 21 settlements[1] were ratified covering approximately 8,576 employees. The average annual base wage increase (AAI) was 1.8% (1.6% public sector; 2.0% private sector). Five settlements received lump sum, stipends or signing bonus payments.

The highest AAI reported was 3.5% for settlements pertaining to transportation, communications, and utilities. The agreement for City of Ottawa firefighters had the largest number of employees (approximately 1,021 employees) and received an AAI of 2.8%.[2]

Consumer Price Index in Ontario for May was 1.4% and averaging 2.0% for the year.

Table 1: Average Annual Increase by Industry – May
Industry Settlements Employees Average Annual Increase
(%)
January – April
(%)
Construction 1 700 1.7 1.8
Education and Related Services nil nil nil 1.7
Health and Social Services 9 2,707 1.3 1.4
Manufacturing 3 788 1.4 1.6
Other Services 4 1,308 1.4 2.8
Primary nil nil nil nil
Public Administration 2 1,571 2.2 1.5
Trade and Finance 1 862 2.2 3.3
Transportation, Communications, and Utilities 1 640 3.5 2.0
All Settlements 21 8,576 1.8 1.7

Collective Bargaining Outlook[3]

Major agreements scheduled to expire include municipalities, police services boards, hospitals, long-term care homes, universities, developmental services, Association of Canadian Advertisers (ACA) and The Institute of Communications Agencies (ICA), and Essar Steel Algoma Inc.

[1] Bargaining units with 150 or more employees.

[2] Including a 1.5% wage increase on January 1, 2014, as per interim award issued on June 30, 2015.

[3]Bargaining situations resulting from recent Ontario Labour Relations Board decisions or agreements that have been ratified prior to the release of the current monthly publication may not be reflected if the settlement information has not been reported to Collective Bargaining Information Services at the publication’s point in time.

For the full report or to be added to the subscription list e-mail cbis@ontario.ca.

ISSN 2371-073X