Table of Contents | Print This Page

About the Mining Health, Safety and Prevention Review

  • Issued: April 15, 2015
  • Content last reviewed: April 2015
  • See also: Addendum

The mining sector is an integral part of Ontario’s economy. With revenues of about $11 billion a year, the sector (underground and surface mining) employs over 26,000 Ontarians directly and creates over 50,000 indirect jobs. It also fuels a vast number of other industries and sectors.

Ontario’s miners work in environments that are subject to various types of occupational health and safety hazards. They are also part of an evolving sector that is making greater use of new technologies and changing processes. Given the risks associated with increasingly complex mining environments, occupational health and safety is paramount.

As the following charts show, the number of lost-time injury claims made to the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board in the mining sector has decreased over the past decade; however the number of worker fatalities has not.

In December 2013, the Minister of Labour asked the Chief Prevention Officer to undertake a Mining Health, Safety and Prevention Review (the Review). The objective of the Review was to examine the occupational health and safety needs of the mining sector. The Review, which focused on underground mining, sought to:

  • assess current and emerging occupational health and safety issues in the mining sector
  • describe the state of health and safety in Ontario mines
  • review past recommendations from public enquiries into mining health and safety and from Coroner’s inquests into mining fatalities
  • make recommendations to enhance and improve mining health and safety.

Its findings and recommendations, if implemented, will help those who work underground go home healthy and safe at the end of every shift. They will also help maintain a productive and innovative mining sector across our province.

Chart 1 - Lost-time Injury Rates Ontario Mining Sector 2004-2013[2]

Bar Graph: Lost-time Injury Rates Ontario Mining Sector 2004-2013

Table 1 - Lost-time Injury Rates Ontario Mining Sector 2004-2013[3]
YearAllowed Lost-time injuries per 100 Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) workers
20041.9
20051.6
20061.5
20071.4
20081.3
20091
20101.1
20111.3
20120.9
20130.8


Chart 2 - Traumatic Fatalities Ontario Mining Sector 2004-2014[4]

Bar Graph: Traumatic Fatalities Ontario Mining Sector 2004-2014

Table 2 - Traumatic Fatalities Ontario Mining Sector 2004-2014
YearNumber of Claims
20043
20051
20063
20074
20082
20091
20100
20116
20122
20132
20146


Chart 3 - Allowed Fatal Occupational Disease Claims Ontario Mining Sector 2004-2013

Bar Graph: Allowed Fatal Occupational Disease Claims Ontario Mining Sector 2004-2013

Table 3 - Allowed Fatal Occupational Disease Claims Ontario Mining Sector 2004-2013[5]
YearAllowed Occupational Disease Fatality Claims
200420
200532
200616
200715
200817
200918
201021
201114
20128
201310


Chart 4 – Top 7 Incident Categories associated with Critical and Fatal Injuries – 2000-2014[6]

Bar Graph: Top 7 Incident Categories associated with Critical and Fatal Injuries – 2000-2014

Table 4 - Top 7 Incident Categories associated with Critical and Fatal Injuries – 2000-2014[7]
Incident ClassificationNumber of Reported Fatal InjuriesNumber of Reported Critical Injuries
Power haulage and transportation off site1256
Falls of ground846
Slips, fall of person5102
Run of material52
Falling, rolling or sliding rock or material of any kind441
Machinery430
Vessels under pressure39

[ 2 ] WSN. 2014. Injury and Occupational Disease Trends in the Mining Industry 2000-2013. Workplace Safety North. North Bay, Ontario, Canada

[ 3 ] Ibid

[ 4 ] Ibid

[ 5 ] Ibid

[ 6 ] WSN. 2015. Occupational Disease, Fatal and Serious Injury Trends in Ontario Mining Sector. Workplace Safety North. North Bay, Ontario, Canada.

[ 7 ] Ibid

Previous | Next