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Appendix B – Health and Safety Statistics

  • Issued: April 15, 2015
  • Content last reviewed: April 2015
  • See also: Final Report

Occupational Health and Safety in Ontario’s Mining Industry

In 2014, 30 critical injuries and six fatalities were reported to the Ministry of Labour for the mining sector[1]. Over the last 10 years, the number of critical injury events reported to the ministry has decreased. On an annual basis, the number of fatalities reported has fluctuated between one and six, and has been slightly higher in the recent past.

From 2005 to 2014, in the Ontario Mining sector:

  • 315 critical injuries were reported to the Ministry of Labour
  • 29 fatalities were reported

Chart 1 – Fatality and Critical Injuries reported to MOL 2005-2014[2]

Bar Graph: Fatality and Critical Injuries reported to MOL 2005-2014

Table 1 - Fatality and Critical Injuries reported to MOL 2005-2014[3]
YearCritical Injury EventsFatality Events
2005451
2006333
2007364
2008382
2009231
2010301
2011315
2012243
2013253
2014306


While traumatic injuries do not show a pattern of decline in the past 10 years a longer term view of fatal injuries shows a decline in both total numbers and in all the causal factor categories.

Table 2 – Fatal Injuries by decade and Causal Factors[4]
Causal Factor1930-
1939
1940-
1949
1950-
1959
1960-
1969
1970-
1979
1980-
1989
1990-
1999
2000-
2014
Total
Explosives572318149520128
Fall of Rock9912010671333198477
Fall of Person69436339212065266
Fall Caught Struck Object333436281017811177
Asphyxiation141298412151
Burn710138300243
Drowning001910121033
Electric Shock5325211019
Miscellaneous181574111048
Run of Muck29342727171055154
Transportation6168406051231313329
Total39236234027415211149451725


In 2013[5], the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) allowed a total of 158 occupational disease fatality claims[6]. Of these, 10 (7%) were related to the mining sector, which is roughly ten times the proportion of the insured workforce engaged in mining work[7]. Given the fact that it can take many years for an occupational disease to develop, it is important for the industry to take steps today to identify and address potential future sources of occupational disease. Prevention has the potential to save many lives.

In terms of WSIB injury claims in the mining sector, the number has declined over the past 10 years. In 2013, the mining sector had an allowed lost time injury rate of 0.79 per 100 workers, which is less than half the 2004 rate of 1.73 per 100 workers[8]. This trend reflects a drop in allowed lost time injuries from 389 to 231 – despite an increase in the insurable workforce over that time period[9]. Throughout this period, the lost time injury rate in mining has been lower than the average of Schedule 1 employers[10], and it has declined more sharply than the overall rate among Schedule 1 employers (i.e. from 1.88 to 0.95 injuries per 100 insured workers)[11].

Chart 2 – Allowed Lost Time Injury Rate in Mining Sector has Declined over the Last 10 Years[12]

Line Graph: Allowed Lost Time Injury Rate in Mining Sector has Declined over the Last 10 Years

Table 3 – Allowed Lost Time Injury Rate in Mining Sector has Declined over Last 10 Years[13]
YearAllowed Lost Time Injury Rate
20041.73
20051.39
20061.26
20071.30
20081.13
20090.96
20100.98
20111.12
20120.87
20130.79


Table 4 – Ministry of Labour Activity in Underground Mining Sub-sector by Fiscal Year[14]
Events and Activities2011-122012-132013-14
Field Visits[15]640528645
Orders117711901223
Work Refusals[16]242
Complaints[17]553128

[ 1 ] Events include only those that have been reported to the Ministry, and may not represent what actually occurred at the workplace.
A fatal injury within Ministry of Labour jurisdiction includes an injury or incident resulting in the death of an employee. This excludes death from natural causes, death of a non-employee at a workplace, suicides, death under the jurisdiction of the Criminal Code, Highway Traffic Act and Canada Labour Code and death from occupational exposures that occurred many years ago. The Ministry of Labour investigates injuries in employees covered by the Occupational Health and Safety Act.
The critical injury numbers represent critical injuries reported to the Ministry, and may not necessarily represent critical injuries as defined by the Occupational Health and Safety Act. Critical injury events recorded in the ministry’s data systems may include injuries to non-employees, as workplaces are required to report events.
Data are subject to change due to inspectors’ updates to the enforcement database.

[ 2 ]Ministry of Labour Data systems

[ 3 ] Ibid

[ 4 ] WSN, EFFFORT Report, as of Jan. 21, 2015

[ 5 ] WSIB data for 2014 will be released mid-2015.

[ 6 ] Workplace Safety and Insurance Board. (2014). By The Numbers: 2013 WSIB Statistical Report, Schedule 1, pp.97 Data is at March 31st, 2014 for the entitlement year.

[ 7 ] Based on WSIB covered employment for Schedule 1, (2014) pp 9. Data is as at March 31st of the following year for each injury/illness year.

[ 8 ] Workplace Safety and Insurance Board. (2014). By The Numbers: 2013 WSIB Statistical Report, Schedule 1, pp.13 Data is at March 31st, 2014 for the entitlement year

[ 9 ] Workplace Safety and Insurance Board. (2014). By The Numbers: 2013 WSIB Statistical Report, Schedule 1, pp.10-11 Data is at March 31st, 2014 for the entitlement year.

[ 10 ] Schedule 1 employers are required by legislation to pay premiums to the WSIB and are protected by a system of collective liability. The WSIB pays benefits to injured workers the pooled insurance fund so Schedule 1 employers are relieved of individual responsibility for actual accident costs.

[ 11 ] Workplace Safety and Insurance Board. (2014). By The Numbers: 2013 WSIB Statistical Report, Schedule 1, pp.13. Data is at March 31st, 2014 for the entitlement year.

[ 12 ] WSIB (2014). By The Numbers: 2014 WSIB Statistical Report, Schedule 1. Data is as at March 31st of the following year for each injury/illness year.

[ 13 ] Ibid.

[ 14 ] Ministry of Labour – Sector Trend report

[ 15 ] Includes investigation and inspection activity.

[ 16 ] As reported to the Ministry of Labour

[ 17 ] As reported to the Ministry of Labour

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