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8. Learning Outcomes

Joint Health and Safety Committee (JHSC) certification training is an outcomes-based program which means that certain knowledge and skills must be attained in order for a person to successfully complete the program. The following are the learning outcomes that must be achieved.

8.1. Part One Learning Outcomes

The following Learning Outcomes only may be delivered in an eLearning format for one (1) day or six and a half (6.5) hours of the Part One training:

  • 8.1.1
  • 8.1.2
  • 8.1.5
  • 8.1.6

Upon completion of Part One training, learners must be able to:

8.1.1. Describe the certification process and explain the role of the certified member.

  1. Explain the certification process and provide an overview of the Part One, Part Two and Refresher training requirements.

8.1.2. Describe the importance of occupational health and safety and outline the roles of each of the workplace parties.

  1. Explain why occupational health and safety is important for workers and employers. Describe the contribution of certification training to the goal of making Ontario workplaces as safe and healthy as possible.
  2. Outline the roles and responsibilities of the different workplace parties in achieving effective health and safety programs, practices, and performance. Describe how this relates to the Internal Responsibility System (IRS).

8.1.3. Identify occupational health and safety legislation, demonstrate how to access information from it, and explain the basic rights, responsibilities, and training requirements.

  1. Describe the structure of the Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA). Describe how to read laws, regulations, and standards, and practice finding information in the OHSA and regulations.
  2. Outline how the regulations, standards, codes, guidelines, policies, and collective agreements support and supplement the OHSA.
  3. Describe the following features of the OHSA and find relevant sections. Outline how these requirements are expressions of the IRS and how they work together:
    1. The rights and responsibilities of employers, constructors, workers, supervisors, directors and officers of a corporation, owners and suppliers;
    2. The worker's responsible exercise and management of the “right to know”, “right to participate”, and “right to refuse”;
    3. An overview of the training requirements of the OHSA and its associated regulations;
    4. The employer’s obligation to develop a health and safety policy and program, as well as a workplace violence and workplace harassment policies and programs.
  4. Describe how supervisors, employers and workers may participate in Ministry of Labour inspections and investigations.
  5. Describe methods of enforcement outlined in Part VIII of the OHSA (e.g., Ministry of Labour orders, stop work orders, etc.).

8.1.4. Describe the purpose, legal requirements for, and rights, duties, and function of JHSCs and describe how a functioning JHSC works.

  1. Describe the purpose of the Joint Health and Safety Committee.
  2. Describe the legal requirements for establishing and maintaining a JHSC and find relevant provisions in the OHSA.
  3. Describe the rights, duties, and function of the JHSC and find references in the OHSA.
  4. Describe how JHSCs can develop and maintain effective communication, participation, teamwork, and problem-solving processes, and the merits of worker-manager co-operation in health and safety; and.
  5. Demonstrate group process and problem-solving skills by applying effective listening, participation, and co-operation techniques to an occupational health and safety problem using a JHSC role play, case study or exercise.

8.1.5. Describe the rights, duties and responsibilities of JHSC members and certified members.

  1. Describe the rights, duties, and responsibilities of JHSC members and certified members and find references in the OHSA.
  2. Describe the responsible exercise and management of the right to stop work; and
  3. Describe the circumstances in which a JHSC member or certified member interacts with the Ministry of Labour.

8.1.6. Describe the categories of hazards and the basic process of recognizing, assessing, and controlling hazards, and evaluating the hazard controls.

  1. Explain the following terms:
    1. Hazard;
    2. Occupational injury; and
    3. Occupational illness.
  2. Explain what is meant by “recognize, assess, and control hazards, and evaluate the hazard controls”.
  3. Describe the legislated roles and responsibilities of the workplace parties in recognizing, assessing, and controlling hazards, and evaluating the hazard controls.
  4. Describe the hazard categories and give examples for each:
    1. Physical;
    2. Chemical;
    3. Biological;
    4. Musculoskeletal ;
    5. Psychosocial; and
    6. Safety.
  5. Identify and give examples of the five factors that can contribute to a health and safety hazard (people, equipment, materials, environment and process).
  6. Explain how a substance may exist as a gas, liquid, or solid, and how these states may be altered. Explain how they relate to the routes of entry to the body (inhalation, absorption, ingestion and injection).
  7. Explain the body systems that could be affected, and how these effects may be acute, chronic, local, systemic, latent or interactive.
  8. Introduce a Hazard Management Tool and describe how it is used.

8.1.7. Explain hazard recognition and the process for workplace inspections and identify the legal requirements.

  1. Explain how hazard recognition is the initial identification of the potential for, or existence of, a hazard.
  2. Identify the legal requirements for workplace inspections by JHSC members under the OHSA and state the purpose of the inspection. In addition:
    1. List the information and tools needed to prepare for a workplace inspection;
    2. Demonstrate how to conduct a workplace inspection and how to identify hazards during the inspection; and
    3. Describe how to prepare an inspection report for the JHSC and describe follow-up procedures.
  3. Describe additional methods for identifying hazards such as:
    1. Documenting worker concerns;
    2. Observation; and
    3. Review of documents such as workplace records and WSIB or Ministry of Labour reports.

8.1.8. Explain the purpose of and describe basic methods for doing a hazard assessment.

  1. Explain how hazard assessment helps to determine how serious a hazard is.
  2. Describe how to assess health and safety hazards using methods such as:
    1. Inspections;
    2. Investigations;
    3. Job-hazard analysis;
    4. Observations;
    5. Interviews;
    6. Measurement against a workplace or recognized standard;
    7. Determination of compliance with regulations or legislation; and
    8. Comparison to other accepted standards and practices.
  3. State the purpose of exposure monitoring. In addition:
    1. Identify factors JHSC members should consider when present at the beginning of monitoring and when reviewing testing strategies and results.
    2. Identify regulations and standards for limits of exposure such as R.R.O 1990, Reg 833 Control of Exposure to Biological or Chemical Agents, O. Reg. 490/09 Designated Substances and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists guidelines; and
    3. Define the terms: exposure values, threshold limit value (TLV), time weighted average limit (TWA), short term exposure limit (STEL), and ceiling exposure limit (C).

8.1.9. Explain the purpose of, and describe basic methods of, hazard control.

  1. Explain that hazard control is reducing or eliminating hazards.
  2. Describe how health and safety hazards may be controlled (at the source, along the path, and at the worker).
  3. Explain the qualities of an effective control.
  4. Describe five types of controls (elimination, substitution, engineering, administrative and personal protective equipment), explain the hierarchy of controls, and give examples of how they may be applied to health and safety hazards.

8.1.10. Explain the purpose of the evaluation of hazard controls.

  1. Explain the purpose of evaluating hazard controls.

8.1.11. Practice hazard recognition, assessment, and control, and evaluation of the hazard controls.

  1. Practice hazard recognition, assessment, and control, and evaluation of the hazard controls through an activity using a Hazard Management Tool.

8.1.12. State the requirements for, and describe the processes for, reporting and investigating fatalities, critical injuries, work refusals, and complaints of dangerous circumstances.

  1. State the legal requirements for reporting and investigating fatalities and critical injuries, work refusals, and complaints of dangerous circumstances.
  2. Describe the need for thorough investigations and an effective reporting system.
  3. Describe the roles and responsibilities of the Ministry of Labour, police, and workplace parties in an investigation.
  4. Describe responsibilities of the workplace parties at the scene of an injury.
  5. Using a case study, illustrate an effective investigation using:
    1. Information gathering tools (e.g., effective note taking);
    2. Interviewing skills;
    3. Data analysis;
    4. Report writing; and
    5. Follow-up recommendations and compliance schedules.

8.1.13. Review and understand the legislative requirements for access to occupational health and safety information and demonstrate how to access typical sources of occupational health and safety information.

  1. Describe the rights to information under the OHSA.
  2. List occupational health and safety resources and information available to the certified member, and discuss when experts should be consulted.
  3. Describe how to assess occupational health and safety information, and how workplace parties can stay current with changes to legislation and regulations; and
  4. Identify sources of information on the occurrence of injury and disease (e.g., workplace records, Workplace Safety and Insurance Board reports). Describe how this information can be used to identify problems and evaluate programs.

8.2 Part Two Learning Outcomes

A Part Two program must include at least six hazards relevant to the committee member’s workplace.

Upon completion of Part Two training, learners must be able to:

8.2.1. Describe key concepts of Part One training including the process of how to recognize, assess and control hazards, and evaluate the hazard controls.

  1. Review key concepts of Part One training including hazard recognition, assessment, and control methods, and evaluation of the hazard controls.
  2. Review the provincial hazard priorities and practice applying a hazard management tool to these priorities.

8.2.2. Apply recognition, assessment, control, and evaluation principles to each of the workplace hazard(s) selected for the training program.

  1. Describe the hazard and how it may cause injury or illness.
  2. Identify the relevant legislation, standards and guidelines for the hazard.
  3. Describe how to recognize and assess the hazard.
  4. Describe ways of controlling the hazard.
  5. Describe ways of evaluating the hazard control(s).
  6. Using an actual workplace scenario, practice completing a Hazard Management Tool.

8.2.3. Create a draft action plan and recommendations for the employer on at least one hazard in Learning Outcome #2.

  1. Using an actual workplace scenario, prepare an action plan to control at least one hazard.
  2. Using the action plan from 3a, prepare sample recommendations to the employer.

8.3 Refresher Training

Refresher training will:

8.3.1. Review key concepts from Part One training and Part Two training.

  1. Review rights, duties and responsibilities of JHSC members and certified members.
  2. Review the roles, duties, and responsibilities of workplace parties.
  3. Review the rights, duties, and functions of the JHSC.
  4. Review the concepts of hazard recognition, assessment, and control, and evaluation of the hazard controls and a Hazard Management Tool.
  5. Review any other applicable content from JHSC certification training as may be identified by the approved training provider or the Ministry of Labour.

8.3.2. Describe changes or updates to relevant legislation, standards, codes of practice and occupational health and safety best practices.

  1. Describe changes or updates, if any, to legislation, standards and codes of practice in the last three years.
  2. Describe new advances in occupational health and safety best practices, if any, in the last three years.
  3. Describe hazards that have emerged in the committee member’s workplace in the last three years.

8.3.3. Provide opportunity for learners to share JHSC best practices, and to discuss JHSC challenges and potential resolutions.

  1. Share a best practice based on the committee member’s experience as a JHSC member.
  2. Share challenges based on the committee member’s experience as a JHSC member.
  3. Brainstorm approaches to resolve challenges from 3b.

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